SCP-1283
rating: +106+x
SCP-1283.jpg

SCP-1283

Item #: SCP-1283

Object Class: Safe

Special Containment Procedures: SCP-1283 is to be contained in a soundproof storage locker, tuned to a frequency free of broadcasts, with volume on its lowest setting. It is to be checked daily for damage or irregular activity by staff equipped with sound-dampening headphones. In the event that SCP-1283 activates and SCP-1283-1 begins speaking, the nearest Level 3 staff is to be notified immediately, and whoever is determined to have triggered SCP-1283-1 is advised to ignore all vocalizations and remove themselves from the area immediately. In a testing situation, participating researchers are required to wear sound-dampening headphones for the first five (5) minutes of the test, to ensure that only the intended test subject will trigger SCP-1283-1. In the event that personnel other than intended test subjects begin to focus on SCP-1283, they are to be restrained and sedated immediately.

Description: SCP-1283 is a 1930's era home radio, with manufacturing labels that indicate it was made by the ████████ company. The object shows very little damage or wear despite its age. Despite the object's obsolete parts, it has shown to be capable of receiving signals and playing with a consistently high quality of sound, with very little noise or interference. Additionally, SCP-1283 is capable of functioning even when switched off, without any apparent source of power. Inspection of the internal mechanisms of the object reveal parts consistent with other radios of identical make and model.

SCP-1283's anomalous effects become apparent when a person, hereafter referred to as the subject, listens to it for more than fifteen (15) minutes, regardless of what frequency the radio is tuned to. When said amount of time has passed, anything playing on the radio at that time will become silent, and a voice, hereafter referred to as SCP-1283-1, will address the subject by name. Invariably, the voice utilized by SCP-1283-1 belongs to someone known to the subject. Testing has observed SCP-1283-1 belonging to close friends, parents, spouses, authority figures, and on one occasion, a news anchor from the ██████ Network. On occasion, the voice used by SCP-1283-1 has been that of a deceased person. Interviews suggest that the voice chosen by SCP-1283-1 belongs to whomever the subject considers to be the most trustworthy. Attempting to manipulate the frequency, volume, or AM-FM settings of the radio after SCP-1283-1 has begun speaking produces no results.

After SCP-1283-1 has gained the subject's attention, it instructs them to listen carefully. At this stage the subject will begin to focus exclusively on SCP-1283, and will resist attempts to distract them from it. SCP-1283-1 will then provide the subject with information regarding an upcoming event. All information provided by SCP-1283-1 to a subject will be referred to as SCP-1283-2. SCP-1283-2 occurs in three individual phases, each prefaced by a distinct phrase that has been present across all testing. The three phases appear to have nothing connecting them, and only currently affected subjects display any awareness of meaning.

Description of SCP-1283-2: The first phase is prefaced with the question "Do you remember" and involves SCP-1283-1 prompting the subject to remember a specific person, object or event. This phase, like SCP-1283-1, has shown to have personal relevance to the subject, either directly or indirectly.1 Subjects display no difficulty recalling this information, regardless of obscurity.

The second phase, prefaced with the statement "Something bad is going to happen," involves SCP-1283-1 giving a warning to the subject. To outside listeners, this warning is cryptic, meaningless, and appears to bear no relation to the first phase. However, no test subject has expressed confusion in regards to the warning. Instead, subjects react with initial shock and surprise, followed by increasing levels of anxiety. Despite distress, subjects continue to resist attempts to stop them from listening to SCP-1283.

The final phase of SCP-1283-2 is prefaced with the statement "You can stop it." Here, SCP-1283-1 delivers a set of instructions to the subject, with an assurance that following them will stop the threatened event. The instructions vary from simplistic and easily performed to complex and dangerous, and no discernible pattern has been observed. After instructions have been given, SCP-1283-1 becomes silent, and expected programming will resume. At this point, the subject's anxiety will have grown into a severe panic, and they will indicate an intense desire to perform the instructions presented to them and avert the threatened event. Attempts to stop the subject from doing so has resulted in pleading, threats, and in some cases, violent resistance.

Addendum 1283-1:  If subjects are allowed to successfully complete the given instructions, their panicked state dissipates, and subjects typically report feelings of intense relief. Observation suggests that subjects act with above average calm and reasoning abilities in future panic situations.2 Interviewed subjects report retention of memories of the radio conversation, but any questions regarding the warning given in the second section of SCP-1283-2 elicit only confused responses. No subject has been able to determine any connection between the prompted memory and the warning.

In the event that a subject is kept from performing the given instructions for an extended period of time, their panic will continuously increase, until the subject proves inconsolable and displays a single-minded drive to follow the instructions. However, these effects have proven reversible. Heavy sedation and Class-A amnestics used in conjunction have proven effective in countering the effects of listening to SCP-1283. Subjects dealt with in this manner do not display any desire to perform the given instructions, but have shown to be more susceptible to anxiety and panic.

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